Skip to content ↓

Science: Beyond the Classroom

Biology 

Biology is the Science of life and by studying Biology you are opening doors to any number of careers in which you will keep on learning throughout your life. Biology is an ever changing field. Whether you want to keep up to date on the latest work on Cancer research or find out more about the work of veterinary surgeons in anatomy of our weird and wonderful neighbours on this planet, Biology covers every aspect of life that you can think of so dive right in!

Read

  • The New Scientist magazine
  • BMC Biology
  • The Double Helix by James D. Watson
  • The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
  • A Primate’s Memoir: A Neuroscientist’s Unconventional Life Among the Baboons by Robert Sapolsky

Visit

Watch

  • TED talks about the workings of the human mind or how scientists are trying to bring back dinosaurs from chicken skin.
  • Any nature programmes, particularly BBC series such as Planet Earth.

Click On

Royal Society of Biology - their homepage will give you numerous options including careers and competitions.

Contact

If you continue to study biology, you might want to join BioNet - a network for young people interested in biology.

Make & Do

Look out for experiments you can do at home on Science Kids.

Chemistry 

As soon as you wake up in the morning, you start doing chemistry; Chemistry explains why an egg changes when you fry it, how soap and shampoo make you clean, why you feel tired before coffee and alert after it, and how the petrol in your car gets you to school. Chemistry is the subject that reveals the underlying structure of matter and helps explain why different materials behave as they do. It gives us an understanding of what everything, living and non-living, is made up of. Whether its developing specific drugs to target disease, caring for penguin colonies in Antarctica, developing new materials with enhanced properties or working in a dynamic business environment, chemistry can help you achieve your goals.

From research in space, to the depths of the oceans, chemistry helps you understand the world around you and opens up lots of career opportunities. A chemistry qualification can take you almost anywhere.

Read

  • The Disappearing Spoon…and other true tales from the Periodic Table by Sam Kean
  • A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie by Kathryn Harkup
  • Periodic Tales: The Curious Lives of the Elements by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
  • Oxygen: The molecule that made the world by Nick Lane
  • What if? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
  • The Secret life of the Periodic Table by Dr Ben Still Also look out for The New Scientist Magazine.

Visit

Watch

Click On

Visit the Royal Society of Chemistry website - their homepage will give you numerous options including:

  • An interactive Periodic Table (including podcasts)
  • 'On this day in chemistry'
  • Scientific activities by topic

Contact

If you continue to study chemistry, you might want to join ChemNet - a network for young people interested in chemistry.

Make & Do

Look out for experiments you can do at home - check with your parents first - by following in the chemical footprints of Heston Blumenthal and following recipes such as 'Enzymes & jellies' and 'The chemistry of flavour' as detailed in the book 'Kitchen Chemistry' by Ted Lister & Heston Blumenthal.

Physics

Physics is about explaining the world around us. From the very small to the very big, the laws of Physics aim to describe and predict what is happening. Everything we do can be related to Physics so as a passionate Physics specialist you should be asking yourself the question 'Why does that happen'? If you do not know the answer, there are plenty of ideas below that will help you work it out.

Read

  • In Search of Schrodinger's Cat by John Gribbin
  • A brief history of time by Stephen Hawking
  • We Need to Talk About Kelvin: What everyday things tell us about the universe by Marcus Chown
  • The New Science of Strong Materials: Or Why You Don't Fall Through the Floor by J E Gordon
  • Structures Why Things Don't Fall Down by J E Gordon
  • The Last Three Minutes: Conjectures about the Ultimate Fate of the Universe by Paul Davies
  • Alice in Quantumland by Robert Gilmore
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door by Lisa Randall
  • Does God Play Dice?: The New Mathematics of Chaos by Ian Stewart

Also look out for The New Scientist magazine.

Visit

Watch

The BBC often shows some good science programmes. Search for them on iPlayer or view archived content at BBC Science

Click On

PHET Simulations

Make & Do

  • See what you can create with an electronics kit
  • A model robot from a kit (there are some available on Amazon).
  • Solve some equations: Mathematics is a fundamental skill for a Physics student so make sure you are happy rearranging equations. It's not hard, especially with lots of practise.
  • Start using computers: Many Physics graduates end up as computer programmers once they leave University. The problems solving skills you learn as a Physics student are similar to the skills needed when writing computer programs.

In addition to this, many professional Physicists spend a lot of their time writing computer programs. Why don't you get a head of the game and gets yourself a Raspberry Pi.

Paste in video URL and save page via the "Edit" tab at the top of the page